FANDOM


Tactics, Techniques and Procedures Section: Organising Elements
In this section, we will discuss 'Organising Elements', in which a small unit team, on a tactical level can prescribe communication protocols to help in enhancing its efficacy in a range of situations. Further topics being discussed:


Element Definition

          Element

                /ˈɛlɪm(ə)nt /

                      (Mass Noun)


                                     I. A tactical-level personnel structure, organic to an active operational-level command center.
                                       "...We got 2 ground elements en-route to the objective, their time-on-target is ETA 1 mike..."


What is an element via tactical definition?

The element, is an abstract term for the smallest working team-based component on a tactical level. Elements can be fireteams, sections or squads, and mainly operate cohesively in tight-knit capacity. To understand the fundaments of a tactical team, one must first understand the differences between higher command structures that may command them:


  • Strategic vs. Operational vs. Tactical

    • STRATEGIC: the strategic level focuses on the national management of all forms of war or conflict.

    • OPERATIONAL: the operational tier focuses on gaining advantages over OPFOR in a battlespace.

    • TACTICAL: the tactical scale focuses on small-scale maneuvers, engagements and conflicts, also.

      • Summary: if Strategic is large-scale, operational is medium-scale, and tactical is small-scale; purposefully, each serve differing roles and natures, and complement one another in hierarchy.

Summary Edit

In Ground Branch, an Operator is an individual personnel member, as part of a fireteam-level element, therefore it is a tactical-level structure. To properly organise elements, every individual must gain their cohesion through co-ordination, communication and situational clarity. While non-exhaustive, helpfully illustrated examples of organising a team at the tactical level have been provided, please review them. Not all protocols or communications will be covered, however.

Command: Ready Up Edit

The 'Ready Up' command is used by element leaders to prepare a team for entry, or to re-organise the element after a rally-up. The Operator then upon hearing this, will check their respective equipment and munitions, and reply such as "ONE, UP", or "RED ONE, UP" is provided if they are ready. If they are not, they will state their status to the element leader as a standard reply.

It is similar to the "Check-in", but rather than the Operational Commander getting a status from a team at the operational level, the status is tactical level and provided to the element or fireteam leader in control of a squad.

The techniques described below are a non-exhaustive summary, it does not properly reflect its entire uses, nor does it state an absolute objective outline for all interaction involved. It does however, provide a summative overview:

Organising Elements, Command: Ready Up

  1. Element Leader calls 'Ready Up' to Prepare their Element:
    • Individual Operators (incl. the Element Leader) will then reply:
      • 01: Operator 01 checks gear, then replies "ONE, UP"
      • 02: Operator 02 checks gear, then replies "TWO, UP"
      • 03: Operator 03 checks gear, then replies "THREE, UP"
      • 04: Operator 04 checks gear, then replies "FOUR, UP"
      • 05: Operator 05 checks gear, then replies "FIVE, UP"
      • 06: Operator 06 checks gear, then replies "SIX, UP"
  2. The Element will either "Execute" a following Command / Make Entry.
  3. In an Open Environment, i.e. Non-Stacked, the "Response Order" may follow per Operator Number, assigned by the S-3 or Acting Lead of that element. It however, will vary from unit to unit, and is not a hard and fast rule/order.

Command: Detach Edit

The 'Detach' command, used primarily to separate a given element into smaller, more lightweight and dynamic groupings. Called strictly by unit leaders, or by standing/acting team lead, Operators will shift accordingly while maintaining fluidity, typically a colour or phonetic is also assigned.

The techniques described below are a non-exhaustive summary, it does not properly reflect its entire uses, nor does it state an absolute objective outline for all interaction involved. It does however, provide a summative overview:

Organising Elements, Command: Detach

  1. Element Leader states X Number of Personnel Split into Direction.
    • Requires: Colour or Phonetic Callsign (such as Alpha/Bravo)
    • Requires: Known Number of Personnel Assigned to Detach
  2. Recommended: Upon splitting off, a 'Ready-Up' is given, with the correct colour or callsign, number and status being provided, also.
     



Command: Fall In Edit

The 'Fall In' command, used primarily to re-unify a separated element as a singular, whole element again. May also be used to attach a remainder unit requiring a lead. Called strictly by the given unit leaders, or by the standing or acting team lead, Operators will shift accordingly into the element, and 'Ready Up' using their position number, followed by the "UP" status reply.

The techniques described below are a non-exhaustive summary, it does not properly reflect its entire uses, nor does it state an absolute objective outline for all interaction involved. It does however, provide a summative overview:

Organising Elements, Command: Fall In

  1. Element Leader calls named Detachment or Element to "Fall In".
    • Requires: Colour or Phonetic Callsign (such as Alpha/Bravo)
    • Requires: Responding Colour/Callsign to Re-Merge Element
  2. Recommended: Upon Falling In, the 'Ready-Up' is given, with the correct colour or callsign, number and status being provided, also.




Command: Status Edit

The "Status" (or "SITREP" Command), used primarily to gain battlespace insight into other personnel or teams in the operation. Requires that lead element operators from other teams respond with their current situational state, followed by any interrogative requests for updated operational state, so as to inform/update the Commander with the relevent unit information.

The techniques described below are a non-exhaustive summary, it does not properly reflect its entire uses, nor does it state an absolute objective outline for all interaction involved. It does however, provide a summative overview:

Organising Elements, Command: Status Report/SITREP

  1. Element Leader calls for a STATUS REPORT or SITREP on units.
    • Requires: Respective Elements/Teams respond in order of the organisational structure, as pre-determined by a commander.
    • Requires: each of above elements provide situation or state.
  2. Recommended: Determine order precedence, alternatively the lead may directly contact the team, i.e. "BLUE, RED, STATUS REPORT", the example above, is Red Team → Calling Blue → "COMMAND".




Command: Tighten Formation Edit

The "Tighten Up", "Close-In" or "Tighten Formation" command, used as a means to tightening a formation's spacing during operation. Requires that the element leader understands the proper implications of a spatial area in relation to their element; and adapts their spacing accordingly if a cause for concern emerges. Individual Operators will comply by forming up tightly.

The techniques described below are a non-exhaustive summary, it does not properly reflect its entire uses, nor does it state an absolute objective outline for all interaction involved. It does however, provide a summative overview:

Organising Elements, Command: Tighten Up/Tighten Formation

  1. Element Leader calls for element spacing to tighten up in formation.
    • Requires: situation needing formation corrections, such as being too far apart which may cause potential loss of lives.
    • Requires: each operator comply by adjusting position ASAP.
  2. Recommended: only adjust formation is the situation warrants it.




Command: Spread Out Edit

The "Spread Out", "Fan-Out" or "Formation Spread" command, used as a means to loosening a formation's spacing during operation. Requires that the element leader understands the proper implications of a spatial area in relation to their element; and adapts their spacing accordingly if a cause for concern emerges. Individual Operators will comply by forming up tightly.

The techniques described below are a non-exhaustive summary, it does not properly reflect its entire uses, nor does it state an absolute objective outline for all interaction involved. It does however, provide a summative overview:

Organising Elements, Command: Spread Out/Fan-Out

  1. Element Leader calls for formation spacing to spread out evenly.
    • Requires: situation needing formation corrections, such as being too tightened which may cause potential loss of lives.
    • Requires: each operator comply by adjusting position ASAP.
  2. Recommended: only adjust formation is the situation warrants it.




Command: Waypoint Status Edit

The "Waypoint" status command, used primarily to denote when a unit or element has reached a specific waypoint, or is standing prior to one. This requires that the element leader confirms their presence prior, during and after the waypoint secure, or if required the inability to reach the waypoint.

The techniques described below are a non-exhaustive summary, it does not properly reflect its entire uses, nor does it state an absolute objective outline for all interaction involved. It does however, provide a summative overview:

Organising Elements, Command: Waypoint Status Report

  1. Element Leader checks in, confirming their location in relation to the waypoint, for instance the first check-in will be prior to their securing the waypoint, such as: "RED, OUTSIDE WAYPOINT 1" via the radio.
  2. During entry-to, or securing-of; Element Leader checks in, and is then to confirm "RED, SECURING WAYPOINT 1" as an update via radio.
  3. Finally, Element Leader states "WAYPOINT ONE: SECURE" via radio.
    • OR: "UNABLE TO SECURE WAYPOINT 1" if needed.
  4. Recommended: at minimum, "SECURING WAYPOINT 1" is best.




Command: Objective Status Edit

The "Objective" status command, used in conjunction with the Go-Code so as to affect an organised taking of a given objective. The element leader will state their 'standing by' status, outside of an objective, upon authorisation to take said objective (denoted by a Go-Code), the element will then attempt to obtain the objective, which may require dynamic entry by others standing by.

The techniques described below are a non-exhaustive summary, it does not properly reflect its entire uses, nor does it state an absolute objective outline for all interaction involved. It does however, provide a summative overview:

Organising Elements, Command: Objective Status Report

  1. Element Leader checks in, confirming their location in relation to the objective, example: "RED, AWAITING GO AT OBJECTIVE ALPHA".
    • Requires: team be standing by in 'stand-by' position outside objective, and requires team leader request the GO-CODE.
    • Requires: other elements move into their respective position outside of objective, and then request the same GO-CODE.
  2. Element Leader in control then authorises a 'GO', either via CODE such as 'ZULU GO' or other pre-determined entry go-code terms.
  3. Team affects attempt to secure objective, all at once via GO-CODE.
  4. Recommended: only use go-codes for multi-team, dynamic entries.




Command: Rendezvous Edit

The "Rendezvous" status command, used to denote a location in which the battlespace elements can attempt to converge at. The element leader will state/designate a rendezvous (or rv) point, and all relevant elements comply by confirming in the positive "Affirmative", "Copy that", et cetera. Finally, the additional elements will converge upon their agreed rendezvous location.

The techniques described below are a non-exhaustive summary, it does not properly reflect its entire uses, nor does it state an absolute objective outline for all interaction involved. It does however, provide a summative overview:

Organising Elements, Command: Rendezvous

  1. An Element Leader commands other elements or individuals meet at the designated location. example "RENDEZVOUS AT THE EXIT".
    • Requires: all complying units state their compliance on radio in the positive such as "Copy That" / "Affirmative" in compliance.
  2. All respective elements meet at location, in an orderly, fluid nature.
  3. Recommended: following the rendezvous, perform a "Ready-up".




Command: Go-Code Edit

The "Go-Code" status command, used primarily to invoke an execution of a pre-determined order such as an entry, or assault via the co-ordination of all battlespace elements. For instance, if a hostage situation requires that many numerous rescue elements enter at the same time, a go-code may be set to co-ordinate that all elements converge/assault at the same time in the plan.

For example, a team leader may state that "BLUE, BREACH, BANG AND CLEAR, ON ZULU", and then set their RED team, to stand by at the same time, at an alternative entry point. Then execute it via a "ZULU, GO!" order.

The techniques described below are a non-exhaustive summary, it does not properly reflect its entire uses, nor does it state an absolute objective outline for all interaction involved. It does however, provide a summative overview:

Organising Elements, Command: Go-Code

  1. An Element Leader commands other elements or individuals to execute a specific order, but on a 'GO-CODE' such as "ON ZULU".
    • Requires: all complying units respond with compliance or status.
    • Requires: all compliant units then get into position for go-code.
  2. Element Leader, once ready, executes the order via "ZULU, GO" and..
  3. All Remaining Elements comply, and execute at the same time as Lead.
  4. Recommended: only use Go-Codes if multiple dynamic entry is needed.




Command: Clear/All Clear Status Edit

The "Clear" or "All Clear" status command, used to denote whether or not the Operator's Area of Responsibility (AOR) is clear or not. Example, your sector is clear (in this case, you clear right) so "CLEAR RIGHT" is stated, and, if all sectors are cleared, the element's leader states "ALL CLEAR" so as to notify any outside security personnel, guarding the area, that it is clear.

The techniques described below are a non-exhaustive summary, it does not properly reflect its entire uses, nor does it state an absolute objective outline for all interaction involved. It does however, provide a summative overview:

Organising Elements, Command: Clear/All Clear Status

  1. Upon clearing their sector, an Operator will state "Clear" and their direction, for example: "Left Clear" or "Right Clear" as is required.
    • Requires: you only state clear, if the area is genuinely clear of any hostile or enemy threats, and you maintain your set AOR.
  2. Upon all areas being successfully 'Cleared', only then can the Lead Element Operator call "All Clear", to notify their outside rear guards.
    • Rear Guards: may not enter unless all clear, and requested to do so, which is given via the "Fall-in" Command, via the radio.
    • Alternatively: team leader will state "Friendlies Coming Out" if exiting the room, and must hear complying rear guards state "COME ON OUT" or "FRIENDLIES, COME ON OUT" in return.
  3. Recommended: Call "Clear" in the order upon which the operators enter.




Command: Identification Friendly/Foe (IFF) Edit

The "IFF", "IDENTIFICATION FRIENDLY/FOE" or "ID FRIENDLY/FOE", a command used to clarify if an unknown contact is hostile or not. When the lack of relevant arm patches or uniform signifiers are available, the squad or element may provide an interrogative "FRIENDLY?", and await a reply to confirm if friendly or not, if no such "FRIENDLY!" is given, actions may be taken to prosecute an otherwise potential threat towards the fireteam.

The techniques described below are a non-exhaustive summary, it does not properly reflect its entire uses, nor does it state an absolute objective outline for all interaction involved. It does however, provide a summative overview:

Organising Elements, Command: IFF Status

  1. If upon identifying an unknown contact, and the situation warrants a further interrogative status, an Operator may state "FRIENDLY?" to verify the intentions and status of an otherwise unidentified contact.
    • Requires: you state "FRIENDLY?" in the proper vocal format.
  2. Upon confirming their state as friendly or hostile, take the relevant actions as required. If the individual does not respond, execute the best course of action, within your given units rules or regulations.
  3. Recommended: always give the contact a chance to verify their status.




Command: Enemy Contact Edit

The "Contact" status command, used to identify a potential combatant for the Area of Operations (AO) or battlespace. Upon confirming they are the enemy or a hostile threat, the Operator is expected to state their direction with relation to the element, such as "HOSTILE CONTACT, FRONT" as the proper way to state the direction of the enemy in relation to their element.

The techniques described below are a non-exhaustive summary, it does not properly reflect its entire uses, nor does it state an absolute objective outline for all interaction involved. It does however, provide a summative overview:

Organising Elements, Command: Enemy Contact Status

  1. Having successfully verified the contact as HOSTILE, Operator is to state the direction, such as "ENEMY CONTACT, FRONT", replace "FRONT" with wherever the enemy is in relation to the contextual direction that the element is facing. This will likely change, as well.
    • Requires: you call "HOSTILE CONTACT" and "DIRECTION".
  2. NOTE: Front is always the Pointman/Movement Direction of Element.
  3. Recommended: perform contact drills to clarify further on direction.




Community content is available under CC-BY-SA unless otherwise noted.